Driving Lessons Batley 2018-01-20T23:44:24+00:00

Why Choose Driving Lessons Batley?

Driving Lessons Batley should be your first choice for local and relaxed tuition where you learn at your own pace. Alan has been learning people to drive for over 30 years and is one of the recommended independent schools in Heckmondwike, Batley, and Dewsbury. The schools, Driving Instructor Training Establishment is Approved by the D.V.S.A., Inspected by ORDIT as an official training establishment and provides first class tuition at an affordable price. Contact driving lessons near me today.

Call Me Direct On 01924 500474

Or my Mobile: 07876337105

At Driving Lessons Batley Alan knows money can be tight for customers so he keeps his costs down by offering some great deals. Alan also has a choice of two cars, a Volkswagen Polo which is manual and Toyota Yaris for people who would like to pass the automatic car driving test.

Why Automatic Driving Lessons Batley?

Automatic Driving Lessons Batley understand that learning to drive in a manual car is not for everyone – for many people, automatic driving lessons are a better option. Maybe you have had a driving lesson in a manual car before and found it too difficult, or maybe you have a disability that stands in the way of changing gears. If you recognise yourself in one of these scenarios, taking an automatic test could be a better choice.

As there is no clutch pedal, an automatic car may be easier to drive – especially on more congested city roads – and if you are having difficulties managing the gears in a manual car, Driving Lessons Batley, think that you may find that taking automatic driving lessons is a faster route to your licence. Some people just prefer automatic transmissions for city driving as busy traffic means more frequent gear changes for manual drivers.

Before you decide whether to book driving lessons in an automatic or manual car, it’s important to keep in mind that an automatic licence does not permit you to drive a manual car once you have passed your test. That means that going for an automatic now may limit your choice when buying or renting a car or van in the future.

At Driving Lessons Batley, Alan can offer automatic car driving lessons in many areas of Wakefield, Bradford, and Batley, contact Alan on the number provided for availability near you.

Whether you choose automatic or manual driving lessons you can be sure that you will receive the same high standards of tuition from Driving Lessons Batley.

Can Manual driving lessons Batley Help You?

At Driving Lessons Batley our Volkswagen Polo has a Manual Gear Box but Manual driving lessons are the most popular type of driving lessons for learner drivers. Unlike driving an Automatic vehicle, in a manual car, you’ll learn how to operate gears by using a Clutch Pedal and a Gear Stick to select the right gear at the right time.

The majority of learners take lessons in a manual car, and it’s very likely that your first car will have a manual transmission.  Once you’ve passed your driving test in a manual car, you’ll also be qualified to drive cars with automatic transmission too, but if you learn in an automatic car you’ll only be able to drive other automatic cars. You’ll also find that manual cars are generally cheaper to buy and run than automatic cars, so by learning in a manual car, you could save money in the long run, if you need more information from Driving Lessons Batley then follow the link below.

For Further Information On Manual Driving Lessons Contact Me Here

Alans Driving Lessons in Batley

Did you know that Driving Lessons Batley covers most of Wakefield, Morley, and Cleckheaton and is known for its high standard of driver training with learner drivers and successful pass rate. Alan’s long-term aim is not only to teach people to drive but to “save lives on our roads”, i.e. Safe Driving for Life. This website is packed with information to ensure we put you on the right road to driving success.

Each year thousands of people start out along the road to becoming an Approved Driving Instructor (A.D.I.). This means for most the start of a new career, or in some cases a second.

In our experience, too many people do not fully understand what an Approved Driving Instructor does in terms of a job. Nor do they fully appreciate the knowledge and skills needed to be effective and an efficient instructor.

Alans Driving School Batley provides a wide variety of specialist driving tuition including pre-driver training, automatics, refresher courses, driving instructor training, intensive courses, pass plus and tailor-made courses for individuals and industry.

We promise that Driving Lessons Batley will help with everything you need to pass your Driving test and any help you need getting through your theory test.

What is Driver Training Establishment?

If you are looking for Driving Lessons in a Specialist Driver Training Establishment then this information should help you, our main interest is teaching people to drive and courses are designed for any stage of your driving career from beginners to re-tests & from refresher lessons. There is a driving course that is suitable for everyone and Driving Lessons Batley will help you in every way we can to find a course to suit you.

If not we can tailor make a course especially for you or your organisation.

We can arrange both Manual and Automatic tuition.

Daily lessons pick up from home or residential courses dependant on your availability and location.

Call Driving Lessons Batley for more information on available courses

We understand that the driving test is getting harder and longer. You now have to reach a very high standard to pass the new test, which is why our courses are specially designed to help you, reach that high standard.

Can i do Pass Plus lessons in Batley?

Pass Plus driving lessons can be taken by any full licence holder at any time, it will give you a Positive Driving style which is both enjoyable and safe, helping you gain quality driving experience. Driving Lessons Batley know that it will also help in areas where you may have had little or no driving experience and also help to reduce the risk of you being involved in an accident.

By choosing to take part in the Pass Plus course, you have shown that you want to be a skillful and responsible driver. Enjoy it!

It is for you to discuss with your instructor the best method of payment for the course.

“Pass Plus” is a training scheme linked to insurance discounts that will benefit you, the NEWLY QUALIFIED DRIVER.

It can save you money on your car insurance premiums.

Useful books and videos include: The Highway Code, The Driving Manuel, Know your Traffic Signs, “drive” video, etc.

Driving Lessons Batley will be there to help you every step of the way.

Information on Advanced Driving Lessons

Advanced driving is the ability to control the speed of the vehicle safely, systematically and smoothly. Using road and traffic conditions to make reasonable progress unobtrusively, with skill and responsibility.

As agreed between the IAM, RoSPA and DVSA etc, Advanced Driving requires a positive but courteous attitude and a high standard of driving competence based on concentration, effective all round observation, anticipation, and planning. Driving Lessons Batley understands this must be coordinated with good handling skills. The vehicle will always be in the right place on the road at the right time, traveling at the right speed with the correct gear engaged and can always be stopped safely in the distance that can be seen to be clear”… Driving Lessons Batley, offer information on where to find high-quality Advanced Driver Training, updating drivers with modern driving techniques, techniques that will help to reduce crashes, incidents and your vehicle maintenance costs. Training and advice are also available for the following examinations, or just for your own personal satisfaction.

For more information on Advanced Driving Lesson Can Be Found Here.

Help Passing Your Theory Test at Driving Lessons Batley

The Theory Test for learner drivers was first introduced by the D.V.S.A. (Driving Vehicle Standards Agency) in 1996 which is now the D.V.S.A. Its purpose is to better prepare provisional licence holders for driving on today’s demanding roads and all of the responsibilities that come with being a full licence holder.
Since its introduction, the test has been updated several times and now includes a Hazard Awareness test and the use of an SAT NAV, which tests candidates on their reaction to hazards when driving or riding.

To assist Driving Lessons Batley may have available for you to borrow various videos, books and CD’s to help you with your tuition for the Theory test (and Practical) we suggest for the theory test that you study at home with assistance from your instructor when required. Separate theory training is available in most areas by special arrangement (If you are finding the test difficult to pass on your own).

Book Your Theory Test Online Here

Driving lessons are offered to anyone holding a current valid provisional license. (Certain overseas licenses acceptable also) (Application forms for a provisional license/photo – card (D1 & D750) are available from your local Post Office.

Call Driving Lessons Batley Anytime On 07876337105

Useful Information at Driving Lessons Batley

Driving Lessons Batley have put together some really useful links for you to have a browse around the You Gov website, there’s some cracking information on there about learning to drive which we always encourage our customers to have a browse through as part of the preparation for learning to drive. We hope you find these useful, just click on the links below, they will open in new windows for you:

DVSA

Learning To Drive

The Theory Test

Choosing A Driving Instructor

Introduction to the Highway Code for Drivers

The Practical Driving Test Explained

The Pass Plus Scheme for Car Drivers

More About Passing Your Driving Test with Driving Lessons Batley

If you suffer from any physical or even visual disorder you must ensure that the D.V.S.A to consider you fit to drive, and are happy to issue you with a provisional licence.

The restrictions are laid down in a booklet “Medical Fitness to Drive” which is published by the Medical Commision on Accident Prevention. This sets out the standards used by the D.V.S.A to assess fitness to drive. If you are unsure whether you will be allowed to drive or not you should approach your Doctor for advice or information.

If you have a hearing impairment there is no reason why you cannot learn to drive either a manual or automatic vehicle. You are likely to take longer than the average learner, and obviously learning in an automatic vehicle would be slightly quicker. Although any instructor can teach deaf or partially deaf we have instructors who have been specially trained and have experience in teaching pupils with this problem.

Theory Test

When you are ready to take your theory test special arrangements can be made by Driving Lessons Batley for those who are dyslexic or have other reading difficulties, who are deaf or who have other physical disabilities and also for whom English is not their first language. These arrangements must be made in advance when booking the test. You must also confirm that the test centre is accessible if a wheelchair is required.

Driving Test

When you are ready to take your practical test you must also at the time of completing the booking form disclose all relevant information as requested. For example in the case of someone who is profoundly deaf by disclosing this information the examiner can then be properly prepared and extra time can be allocated for the test to allow for slower communication.

Road Safety at Driving Lessons Batley

Alan’s School of Motoring are totally committed to improving the safety of our roads. All of our customers are made fully aware of the potential dangers on the road before they get in the driving seat. Driving Lessons Batley is proud that all of his customers are safer drivers as a result of his attention to detail on road safety.

With traffic accidents being one of the highest killers of our young people, He sees it as jis responsibility to educate and inform all his customers of the dangers of drink driving, speeding, and negligence at the wheel (using mobile phones etc). Driving Lessons Batley also stress the importance of wearing seatbelts which no doubt saves thousands of lives every year in the event of accidents.

If you choose to learn with Alan’s School of Motoring, you will be learning from the best in the business, it is Alan’s philosophy that once you understand and are aware of the potential dangers in driving on the road, you can concentrate on your driving skills. Driving Lessons Batley promises that you would become a better, more confident and safer driver if you learn with him.

For more information regarding our focus on road safety or to book a course of lessons, please either call Alan on 07876 337105 or complete the short form on the contact us page.

Whats the pass rates in batley – Whats the pass rates in UK 2018-01-21T18:21:22+00:00

Statistics on the number and pass rates of driving and riding practical tests conducted in Great Britain for July to September 2017, including statistics on driving instructors.

Download here: driving lessons batley – drt-statistics-july-to-september-2017

During July to September 2017, there were:

  • 551,753 theory tests
  • 498,349 practical tests

Compared with July to September 2016, this was:

  • a decrease of 3.7% across all theory tests
  • an increase of 6.6% across all practical tests

Car tests made up 90% of theory and 89% practical tests during July to September 2017.

Comparing Large Goods Vehicle tests for July to September 2017 to July to September 2016, there was:

  • a decrease of 9.6% in practical vocational tests
  • a decrease of 31.6% in practical CPC (Certificate of Professional Competence) tests

At the end of September 2017, there were 39,386 Approved Driving Instructors (ADI) on the statutory register. This was:

  • a decrease of 0.6% compared to September 2016
  • a decrease of 14.5% compared to September 2012

At the end of September 2017, there were 2,467 approved Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) motorcycle instructors. This was:

  • a decrease of 1% compared to September 2016
  • a decrease of 17.5% compared to September 2012
Hazard perception test 2018-01-20T19:39:23+00:00

Hazard perception test: all you need to know to pass it!

Hazard perception is a critical factor when it comes to safe driving, and it’s definitely something that improves with experience on the road. In fact, there are plenty of advanced driver training schemes out there that focus on the subject of hazard perception, as being aware of the potential dangers unfolding around you is a potential lifesaver.

The government knows it too, which is why the video-based Hazard Perception Test has been a significant element of the Driving Theory Test since 2002. Your Hazard Perception scores must reach a certain standard, or you’ll fail the Theory test even if you’ve aced the Q and A sections. That means it’s vital that you’re prepared for the test, and know what to expect before you turn up for your Theory Test booking.

Hazard Perception Test tips for learner drivers, and what to expect when you sit it.

In practice, the Hazard Perception Test always follows the Q and A session, and you won’t know if you’ve passed the Theory Test until you’ve completed both. Unlike the Q and A which have right and wrong answers, the Hazard Perception Test pass is based on a computer analysis of the time it takes you to react to events unfolding on a series of videos.

The videos are designed to present a series of real-life potential hazards of the kind you’ll confront every day when driving on your own after a successful test pass. Your job is to spot the key moments and click the computer mouse to register you’re on the ball as early as possible before tricky situations have a chance to develop.

While the tests are straightforward to sit, and don’t require any more computer skills than the ability to click a mouse, they can cause problems for candidates. Fortunately, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has a YouTube video explainer, and there are plenty of opportunities to practice the Hazard Perception Test online on driving school websites.

Meanwhile, we’ve put together this guide, featuring the best ways to prepare for it, how long the test takes and what it comprises of, plus what you should and shouldn’t do when it’s your turn to take it.

Hazard perception test: how it works

At the beginning of the test, candidates are shown a video clip about how the test works, but it’s a good idea to get your head around this before you get to the test centre. There are plenty of practice hazard perception tests available online.

The test itself consists of fourteen video clips which feature road scenes you can expect during everyday driving, with at least one developing hazard – something that will cause you to take some form of action (for example changing direction or speed). There’s one clip in the test that will feature two hazards.

The method of measuring awareness and reaction to potential hazards is based on the candidate clicking a computer mouse for every hazard they recognise. Don’t go thinking you can get away with click frantically at everything that moves through.

Official DVSA hazard perception test video

If you dish out clicks willy-nilly assuming you’ll gain marks for being extra cautious and aware, think again. Doing this can actually count against you. As you’d expect, not clicking enough will reduce your score too.

For each video clip, noticing and responding to each hazard as early as possible can achieve a maximum of five points. As mentioned previously though, over-clicking or clicking in a regular pattern will result in a score of zero for that clip and you’ll be informed of your score at the end.

The hazard perception test lasts twenty minutes, and you don’t get the chance to go back and repeat any of the clips or questions. This is to reflect real-life driving where you don’t get a second chance. To pass the hazard perception test, a score of 44 out of 75 must be achieved.

Hazard perception test

Hazard perception test: all you need to know to pass it!

Hazard perception test: five top tips

  1. Practice the test first. There are plenty of online practice hazard perception tests so you know what to expect
  2. Know what a ‘developing hazard’ is and how to identify one
  3. Remember one clip has two hazards to identify
  4. Click as soon as you notice a potential hazard that might turn into a ‘developing hazard’
  5. Don’t overdo the clicking – this will count against you 

 

 

The government knows it too, which is why the video-based Hazard Perception Test has been a significant element of the Driving Theory Test since 2002. Your Hazard Perception scores must reach a certain standard, or you’ll fail the Theory test even if you’ve aced the Q and A sections. That means it’s vital that you’re prepared for the test, and know what to expect before you turn up for your Theory Test booking.

Hazard Perception Test tips for learner drivers, and what to expect when you sit it.

In practice, the Hazard Perception Test always follows the Q and A session, and you won’t know if you’ve passed the Theory Test until you’ve completed both. Unlike the Q and A which have right and wrong answers, the Hazard Perception Test pass is based on a computer analysis of the time it takes you to react to events unfolding on a series of videos.

The videos are designed to present a series of real-life potential hazards of the kind you’ll confront every day when driving on your own after a successful test pass. Your job is to spot the key moments and click the computer mouse to register you’re on the ball as early as possible before tricky situations have a chance to develop.

While the tests are straightforward to sit, and don’t require any more computer skills than the ability to click a mouse, they can cause problems for candidates. Fortunately, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has a YouTube video explainer, and there are plenty of opportunities to practice the Hazard Perception Test online on driving school websites.

Meanwhile, we’ve put together this guide, featuring the best ways to prepare for it, how long the test takes and what it comprises of, plus what you should and shouldn’t do when it’s your turn to take it.

Hazard perception test: how it works

At the beginning of the test, candidates are shown a video clip about how the test works, but it’s a good idea to get your head around this before you get to the test centre. There are plenty of practice hazard perception tests available online.

The test itself consists of fourteen video clips which feature road scenes you can expect during everyday driving, with at least one developing hazard – something that will cause you to take some form of action (for example changing direction or speed). There’s one clip in the test that will feature two hazards.

The method of measuring awareness and reaction to potential hazards is based on the candidate clicking a computer mouse for every hazard they recognise. Don’t go thinking you can get away with click frantically at everything that moves through.

Official DVSA hazard perception test video

If you dish out clicks willy-nilly assuming you’ll gain marks for being extra cautious and aware, think again. Doing this can actually count against you. As you’d expect, not clicking enough will reduce your score too.

For each video clip, noticing and responding to each hazard as early as possible can achieve a maximum of five points. As mentioned previously though, over-clicking or clicking in a regular pattern will result in a score of zero for that clip and you’ll be informed of your score at the end.

The hazard perception test lasts twenty minutes, and you don’t get the chance to go back and repeat any of the clips or questions. This is to reflect real-life driving where you don’t get a second chance. To pass the hazard perception test, a score of 44 out of 75 must be achieved.

 Hazard perception test: all you need to know to pass it!

Hazard perception test: five top tips

  1. Practice the test first. There are plenty of online practice hazard perception tests so you know what to expect
  2. Know what a ‘developing hazard’ is and how to identify one
  3. Remember one clip has two hazards to identify
  4. Click as soon as you notice a potential hazard that might turn into a ‘developing hazard’
  5. Don’t overdo the clicking – this will count against you 
How to pass your driving theory test – Our top tips five Driving theory test  2018-01-20T19:31:42+00:00

Practice makes perfect in the driving theory test, so get up to speed before you book your test online

So you want to pass your driving test. You’ve booked lessons and are getting experience behind the wheel, but one major hurdle you must overcome before taking your practical exam is the theory test.

While the original theory test was a pencil and paper affair, the current exam is done via a touchscreen with multiple choice answers. You can book a theory test online, as long as you already have your provisional licence, although there’s no point in booking the test unless you’re confident that you can score the 86 percent required to pass. That’s just the score you need on the multiple-choice Q&A section. After that, you’ve still got to pass the hazard perception test, which features 14 video clips that require you to click on hazards as soon as they appear on a screen.

However, with enough practice under your belt, and our comprehensive guide to help you pass your driving theory test first time around, the theory exam isn’t as daunting as it might sound.

So read on for a full explanation of the driving theory test itself, what you need to do to pass first time, and what happens next once you’ve aced it!

What is the driving theory test?

The UK driving theory test is the second step towards gaining your full driving licence, after you’ve applied for and received your provisional licence. You must be 17 years of age before you can take the test, although if you qualify for the Personal Independence Payment, then you can start from your 16th birthday. The theory test must be passed before you can book a practical test, and it aims to test your knowledge of the Highway Code and driving in the UK. The questions are based on official Driving and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) guides: The Official Highway Code, Know Your Traffic Signs and The Official DVSA Guide To Driving.

Go online, and you’ll find plenty of mock theory tests, including officially sanctioned Government tests. The majority of these are free and will be useful to get used to how the test is structured and what to expect.

To take a theory test, you must book in advance at an approved driving theory test centre. At the end of the test, you will receive your results and, if you pass, a certificate, which is valid for two years. If you do not pass your practical driving test within two years of passing your theory test, then you will have to retake the theory test.

The fee for the standard car theory test is £23. If you’re taking a motorcycle test, then the fee is the same, while the three tests for lorry and bus drivers to gain their Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC) are £26 for the theory test, £11 for the hazard perception test and £23 for the case studies section.

At the test centre, you will need your provisional photocard driving licence with you. If you have a paper licence, you need to have your signed driving licence and a valid passport in order to take the test. If, for some reason, you don’t have these, either update your licence to a photocard licence or get a passport. If not, you won’t be able to take your test!

In terms of pass rates, the driving theory test currently sits at a disappointing 50.7 per cent, a figure that’s decreased consistently in recent years.

Driving theory test

Driving theory test

Driving theory test: how it works and how to pass

To pass the driving theory test, you will need to pass the multiple-choice question section and hazard perception test in one go.

For the multiple-choice section, you will be required to answer 50 questions in 57 minutes. These are selected at random from a bank of nearly 1,000 questions – so you could be asked anything! To pass, a minimum score of 43 out of 50 is required. You will receive your score at the end of your test and a certificate if you have passed.

If you have a Safe Road User Award, an ‘abridged’ theory test can be taken. This costs less at £19 and requires the candidate to pass 30 out of 35 questions correctly. The hazard perception part is the same as the standard theory test.

While most questions are multiple choice, some come in the form of a case study, whereby you will be given a particular situation and then required to answer five questions following it. These will focus on real-life situations that a driver could come across when driving.

Driving theory test: sample questions

Here are three example questions that represent what you can expect to find in the UK driving theory test, taken from an official online theory test practice:

1)   You get a puncture on the motorway. You manage to get your vehicle onto the hard shoulder. You should:

a) Only change the wheel if you have a passenger to help you,
b) Change the wheel yourself immediately,
c) Try to wave down another vehicle for help,
d) Use the emergency telephone and call for assistance

2)   You want to reverse into a side road. You are not sure that the area behind your car is clear. What should you do?

a) Check the mirrors only,
b) Carry on, assuming it is clear,
c) Look through the rear window only,
d) Get out and check

3)   You wish to park facing downhill. Which TWO of the following should you do?

a) Put the handbrake on firmly,
b) Park close to the bumper of another car,
c) Turn the steering wheel away from the kerb,
d) Park with two wheels on the kerb,
e) Turn the steering wheel towards the kerb

In the test you will be asked to select an answer. In some cases (as above) you will be required to select more than one answer, which will be indicated to you clearly and in capitals. You can skip questions you’re unsure of and come back to them once you’ve answered the rest.

Our top tips five Driving theory test

• Take a practice test before the real thing – there are plenty online

• Remember both parts of your driving licence – you’ll have to do the test another time and pay for it again

• Be mindful of time limits – this applies to both multiple choice and hazard perception sections

• Know what kinds of question you may be asked – question styles and responses can vary

• READ the questions more than once – you don’t want to misunderstand what’s being asked and lose marks 

Driving theory test: what happens next?

Following the multiple choice section of the driving theory test is the hazard perception test. In short, it aims to test a driver’s ability to be aware of dangers and potential risks whilst driving. You are allowed a three-minute break in between these two, or you can just go straight on to the hazard perception test.

Once you’ve passed the theory test, you’re only a practical driving test away from a lifetime on the road…

Passing your practical driving test -The independent driving part of the driving test 2018-01-20T19:15:24+00:00

The independent driving part of the driving test follows on from the first part of the practical driving test. Rather than giving you specific step-by-step instructions as you go, the examiner will give you a set of directions accompanied by a diagram and expect you to drive safely on your own.

You may be asked to follow traffic signs or rely exclusively on the directions you are given before you set off. Remember; this isn’t an exercise in navigation, the priority is to drive safely and well at all times – it doesn’t matter if you go the wrong way.

Passing or failing

The examiner will mark you on all aspects of your driving throughout the practical driving test. You can accrue up to 15 driving faults and still pass but the 16th fault you get will mean failure. When it comes to serious or dangerous faults, however, it’s ‘one strike and you’re out’.

If the examiner thinks you’re a danger to other road users, they will stop the test immediately. Otherwise, you’ll be able to complete the test and return to the test centre where you’ll be told whether you’ve passed or failed.

Passing your practical driving test: 10 top tips

Passing your practical driving test

Here are the top ten to help guide you right from the very beginning, before you’ve even turned a wheel, through to the big day of your practical test.

1. Plan your time

Give yourself a sufficient amount of time to learn how to drive and pass your test. Don’t try to rush the process, as many skills are developed through experience and taking numerous tests can be expensive. Let your instructor advise you on when you are ready.

2. Budget

There are many costs to take in to consideration when learning how to drive so make sure you’ve got the budget in place to see it through. Costs include a provisional driving licence, theory test, professional driving lessons (the UK average is 45 hours) and the practical driving test.

3. Have regular lessons

If possible keep your lessons regular and try to aim for two hours a week behind the wheel. This will help you progress consistently, boosting your confidence, whilst not allowing time to forget what you’ve already learnt and maximise the time spent with your instructor.

4. Record your progress

Keep yourself motivated by noting down when you’ve reached a big milestone and celebrate it. Some tutors use a progress log that helps pupils keep track of where they are on the syllabus, but if yours doesn’t then consider making your own.

5. Practice, practice, practice

Once you’ve gained some experience with an instructor, if possible, get a friend or relative to take you out for extra practice on the road. One of the key ingredients of driving is gaining experience which brings with it confidence. So spend as much time as you can behind the wheel. There are rules about who can accompany a learner – they must be over 21 and have had a full licence for over 3 years. Make sure you have the relevant insurance in place, too.

6. Stay focussed in between lessons

Use interactive online learning tools, such as RED’s Road Brain Trainer or smartphone Apps like Theory Test UK from Driving Test Success, practice spotting potential risks on the road. This will give you a deeper understanding of situations that may occur and how to avoid them.

7. Pass your theory test early

Aim to pass your theory test after 10-14 hours of practical training. Once this has been passed, you can book the practical test and concentrate on working towards the ultimate goal.

8. Take a mock driving test

Do at least one mock test, under test conditions and using a test route. This will help you prepare for the big day and help to settle your nerves as you will know what to expect. An important point is keep the date of your real practical test quiet – the more people you tell the more pressure you will feel on the day.

9. Get good night’s sleep

Make sure that you don’t have a late night before the day of the test. If you have time, have a lesson beforehand to settle the nerves and get you thinking in the right way about your driving.

10. Keep calm

Any time you feel tense or feel you’ve lost your focus, or if you feel you’ve made a mistake on your test, remember to concentrate on your breathing and take a few deep breaths. This will calm your mind, stop you dwelling in the past and help you focus on the next instruction. Remember, any mistake you feel you’ve made may only be minor, in which case you can still pass your test. And don’t feel shy if you didn’t understand something. Ask your examiner to repeat any instructions you’re not sure of.

After you’ve passed your test

Driving is an ongoing learning experience and lessons do not have to stop once you’ve passed your test. Most instructors will be happy to teach you to drive on a motorway, at night and in poor weather conditions so you can improve your skills.

Pass plus is a popular choice and can reduce the cost of your insurance. Telematics insurance, where the insurance company monitors how you drive with a ‘black box’ fitted to your car, is another option to consider. You will be heavily rewarded with cheap insurance for being a sensible driver.

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What Shall i expect on the practical driving test? 2018-01-20T19:06:05+00:00

What Shall i expect on the practical driving test?

The practical driving test is the final hurdle in the process of getting your full UK driving licence. To take it, you’ll need a provisional licence and to have already passed the driving theory test with its hazard perception test element.

The practical test is taken at a driving test centre where an examiner with take you through an eyesight check, some vehicle safety questions that are often referred to as the ‘show me, tell me questions’ and around 40 minutes of practical driving assessment.

The driving part of the test will be split into two parts. The first will have you following directions from the examiner and performing various maneuvers. The second part is the independent driving test where candidates are told to follow traffic signs and/or a set of directions accompanied by a simple diagram.

The eyesight check

practical driving test

practical driving test

First things first, the driving test examiner will want to make sure that you can see well enough to take the test. You will be asked to read a standard car number plate at a distance of around 20 meters.

If you are unable to read the numberplate, you’ll be given a second chance on another numberplate. If you fail to read that one, you’ll be given a final chance with the distance accurately measured out. If you fail again, that will be the end of your test.

If you wear glasses or contact ensues to take the eyesight test, you’re required by law to wear them whenever you drive a car or ride a motorcycle. That includes wearing them for the remainder of your driving test.

Vehicle safety ‘show me, tell me’ questions

practical driving test

Being safe on the road isn’t all about your driving, you’ll also need to be able to check that your car is safe before getting behind the wheel. The vehicle safety questions in the practical driving test are designed to verify that you have a basic knowledge of how to do that.

The questions are often referred to as ‘show me, tell me’ questions as the instructor will ask one ‘show me’ question and one ‘tell me’ question. For the show me question you’ll have to demonstrate how to carry out a basic vehicle safety check and for the tell me question you have to explain how you’d do it. For example, you might be asked to show the examiner the oil filler cap and then tell them how to check the car’s oil level.

If you give the wrong answer for one or both parts of the question, you’ll get one driving fault on your test.

What to expect in the practical driving test

So this is it, the part of your practical driving test where you actually have to drive. For the first part of the test, the instructor will give you directions around a set route designed to take in a variety of different road and traffic conditions. You should drive in the way your instructor has taught you and any mistakes will be marked down as faults by the examiner.

In the first part of the test you’ll be asked to complete one reversing exercise; either reversing around a corner, a turn in the road or reverse parking. You may also be asked to carry out an emergency stop.

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What are your top tips for passing a driving test? 2018-01-20T18:52:01+00:00

What are your top tips for passing a driving test?

And can you pass the first time around?

Are you ready for your practical driving test? Prepare for the big day with our guide and top tips

It’s a special moment for any learner driver when the instructor turns around and utters those momentous words: “I think you’re ready for the test.”

By then, you’ll most likely have driven hundreds of miles and have hours of experience under your belt, but if the prospect of taking the driving test doesn’t inspire a certain amount of anxiety or trepidation you’re blessed with nerves of steel.

Knowing what to expect is half the battle, and hopefully, your instructor will have guided you through plenty of driving test practice runs before encouraging you to make that driving test booking for real.

What with the cost and time commitment of taking driving lessons, and the potentially life-changing consequences of securing a driving licence, it’s all too easy to get overwhelmed by the sense of occasion. But your driving test really shouldn’t be a terrifying experience, either for you or for the examiner. After all, if you were not sufficiently competent, your instructor would not be ready to let you fly solo. You’ll need to have already passed the theory test and hazard perception test in order to book the practical driving test, too, and success there should be a confidence booster for this final hurdle.

Still, it’s perfectly normal to have all sorts of driving test questions popping into your head before your date at the driving test centre, and that’s why we’ve compiled these useful driving test tips to help you prepare. It’s reassuring to know what to expect on the day, and driving examiners are trained to make you feel at ease while they scrutinise your driving skills. So keep calm and stay focused, and there’s no reason why the test should be any more difficult than your usual driving lesson.

As long as you can demonstrate a grasp of all the skills you’ve been learning, and don’t make any careless mistakes, that all-important driving licence will be yours. So read on for more top tips on passing your driving test first time.

Always Feel Free To Contact Alan At Driving Lessons Near Me For Questions on How To Pass Your Driving Test.

 

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